Private file sharing

By | September 7, 2013
Want to share files anonymously? Tor and Tahoe may provide the answer. On the darkweb.

Tor, or the onion, is a proxy layer that shuttles incoming and outgoing data packets through a labyrinth of servers, so that it's original source or destination cannot be determined via eavesdropping on the packet.

Tahoe, a decentralized least-authority file system, provides a way to store files on the cloud without being able to piece the file back together by mere eavesdropping.

The result? It would be interesting to see if Dotcom follows this approach, or another approach, to bring anonymous file sharing to the market. But until then, this looks like a not-too-dumb thing to use.

/via +Wayne Radinsky 

Tahoe and Tor: Building Privacy on Strong Foundations
Many people want to build secure Internet services that protect their users against surveillance, or the illegal seizure of their data. When EFF is asked how to build these tools, our advice is: don’t start from scratch. Find a public, respected, project which provides the privacy-protecting quality you want in your own work, and find a way to implement your dream atop these existing contributions.

3 thoughts on “Private file sharing

  1. Valdis Kletnieks

    +Temple Pate Currently, there's about 4,000 Tor relays running.  And many of them are outside the US.  If you can monitor all traffic both in and out of half the relays, you get about a 12% chance of being able to capture metadata (source, destination) for any given connection.

    And if you use Tor's 'EXTENDCIRCUIT' command, you can enforce a requirement that at least one relay be outside the US, greatly increasing the challenge level for snooping.

    https://thesprawl.org/research/tor-control-protocol/

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  2. Temple Pate

    Actually Tor is a bad way to go. The Government owns many of the nodes that Tor is based on. So far even it is corrupt and I remember reading a post about them confirming they could not agree nor disagree about that. 

    I know mega, uses encryption client side, so it might be wise to use it, then again it could just be a ruse by the government, but so far it seems is secure.

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