The 11th Commandment: Thou shalt not annoy Android App Users

By | August 26, 2013
This policy change solves a long-standing problem with a free-for-all market: following Google's Motto of 'Do no evil', the latest policy change stands to eliminate a lot of advertising nuisances for app users. It does appear a smart thing to do in making Google Play app marketplace more competitive and reputable in light of Apple's app marketplace.

But at the same time, it raises some other questions. Two that come to my mind:
1) Is this what users really want? Would not a device-side negotiation mechanism (block XY permissions to app AB) be more appropriate, assuming the UI could communicate this to users?
2) Are cries of 'censorship' going to rally from influential non-innovators who are not yet ready for a truely mobile business model in light of the policy changes?

/via +David Amerland 

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12 thoughts on “The 11th Commandment: Thou shalt not annoy Android App Users

  1. Marlon Thompson

    Actually +Able Lawrence the Google services do not take up that much space with the exception of Google Play games at 30mb with the rest at around 3 mb and lower and its for your benefit as it gives you access to services that would have been tied to the OS and require a whole new update of the OS itself. What I would advise though is to check the cache of chrome and Google play music as they tend to get filled up pretty fast.

    Reply
  2. Able Lawrence

    +Sophie Wrobel Good move. What are they doing about Android bloat. Android and google services have been bloating up recently taking up more and more disc space and crowding out everything else

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  3. Víktor Bautista i Roca

    «1) Is this what users really want? Would not a device-side negotiation mechanism (block XY permissions to app AB) be more appropriate, assuming the UI could communicate this to users?»

    Isn't this the new policy? Acoording to the article:

    «The user can explicitly allow this but without the user consent, it is no longer allowed.»

    Reply
  4. Marlon Thompson

    To answer your questions 
    1) Yes this is what I want
    2) Don't care its Google's store.

    Google had to do this, Android has reached the point where Google now wants the Google Play store to be more profitable and they only way to do this is to be slightly more stringent. I expect cries of foul by some people who would say Android is open source, but its not. Its more open source than many other mobile OS's but at the end of the day Google is running a business.

    Reply

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