The results sound good, but I still wonder: do the performance results hold on aging…

By | May 2, 2012

The results sound good, but I still wonder: do the performance results hold on aging hardware?

SPDY gains most of it's speed benefit from allowing parallell data transfers over a single connection. For large webpages, this means faster loading. And most web pages are large these days. Yet older hardware is often reaches its limits when the puffer for I/O is exceeded – and begins to act really, really laggy. Is the case for SPDY too?

Reshared post from +PJ Rosenberg

Google : Analyzes SPDY Speeds

Google’s SPDY protocol is a replacement for HTTP that can speed up the load times for Web pages. It’s been used extensively in browsers with Chrome first adopting it and Firefox turning it on by default with the release of Firefox 13. If you have used SPDY, you know it to be great, but can it help improve mobile browsing speeds?

Google has set out to find out the answer to this very question. Through the use of Chrome for Android, they used a Samsung Galaxy Nexus to test the speeds that the mobile Chrome browser returned with SPDY compared to traditional HTTP on the same device. The test was applied to 3G and 4G connections since Wi-Fi, depending on its origin, can return faster speeds than mobile connections.

You would expect SPDY to perform marginally better, but the results were actually pretty surprising and terrific. SPDY load times saw a mean improvement of 23 percent across the 77 Web sites they used in the test. Google did the math and found that this was a 1.3x improvement over HTTP. If you want to see more details of the test Google conducted alongside the methodology they used to reach their results, check out the team’s research page here: http://goo.gl/X5ZOU

Google also released the graph below that charts the speed of SPDY and HTTP across the Web sites they tested on.

2 thoughts on “The results sound good, but I still wonder: do the performance results hold on aging…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.