GMOs, politics, and Peru: a problem with the food industry being recognized

By | April 19, 2012
GMOs, politics, and Peru: a problem with the food industry being recognized

Wow – I am speechless! While I don't think that banning GMOs is the source of the problem – biotechnology can be used positively to accelerate natural evolution to produce more plentiful foods. It can however also be abused to eliminate nature's way of defending itself – and finding the right balance is something that policymakers haven't been able to fo effectively yet. Nonetheless, I do think that Peru has done something exemplary here:

1. They acknowledge that multinational corporations dominating the food industry are acting in self-interest as opposed to farmer's interests, and that there is no quick solution to that problem.

2. They acknowledge the value of biodiversity in the natural ecosystem and the importance of biodiversity and timing in protecting nature's ability to respond to environmental changes and threats.

3. They demonstrate that some governments are still capable of acting in the interests of their common people, sometimes.

/via +John Maguire

Reshared post from +Alida Brandenburg

[Peru pulls a bold move by implementing 10-year ban on all GMO's.]

Way to go, Peru! Not sure how I missed this! Perhaps because none of the mainstream media gave mention of it? (Even a Google search only pulls up independent news sources.) Seems pretty major to me. Now if only we'd take cue. (Given how recent lawsuits have been going though, I'm not too optimistic.)

But there's hope! That there is currently a very important "Right to Know" initiative in California that would require all GMO foods to be labeled. Note that they need physical, not virtual, signatures to get this on the ballot, which means you need to seize the day and get those legs moving down to your local spot! To find out where/how to sign, visit here: http://www.labelgmos.org/ .

Given that California produces nearly half of U.S.-grown fruits, nuts and vegetables, this could be a major landmark move and could signal significant shifts for the rest of the country (and world).

Details on Peru's own revolutionary action below:
"In a massive blow to multinational agribiz corporations such as Monsanto, Bayer, and Dow, Peru has officially passed a law banning genetically modified ingredients anywhere within the country for a full decade before coming up for another review.

"Peru’s Plenary Session of the Congress made the decision 3 years after the decree was written despite previous governmental pushes for GM legalization due largely to the pressure from farmers that together form the Parque de la Papa in Cusco, a farming community of 6,000 people that represent six communities. They worry the introduction of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) will compromise the native species of Peru, such as the giant white corn, purple corn and, of course, the famous species of Peruvian potatoes. Anibal Huerta, President of Peru’s Agrarian Commission, said the ban was needed to prevent the 'danger that can arise from the use of biotechnology.'”
#monsanto #GMO #righttoknow

Peru Passes Monumental Ten Year Ban on Genetically Engineered Foods | Occupy Monsanto
In a massive blow to multinational agribiz corporations such as Monsanto, Bayer, and Dow, Peru has officially passed a law banning genetically modified ingredients anywhere within the country for a fu…

3 thoughts on “GMOs, politics, and Peru: a problem with the food industry being recognized

  1. chalky scoot

    A big cheer to those in Peru who did the right thing and those who fought for it in the first place. If I could remove one company from this earth it would be Monsanto, evil evil MF's

    Reply
  2. Mark Mercer

    Excellent public G+ discussion of this marvelous move by Peru. Agree with all the comments above. Tweeted link to this thread: http://is.gd/xDMmxy.

    I get very disturbed when I see the ADM and Monsanto signs along the wide-open fields in Uruguay.

    Reply
  3. Chris Harrington

    Awesome. The only problem with biotechnology is the clash between the time table of free market capitalism and nature's time table. When individual farmers are engaged in improving breeds, things seem to work more often then not (though sometimes not). The biotech industry's need for a return on investment as soon as possible is where the real problems begin.

    Reply

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