An excellent summary from +EuroTech of the differing positions of key European countries…

By | January 3, 2012
An excellent summary from +EuroTech of the differing positions of key European countries on the issue of how to handle file-sharing and internet censorship. Also note that in some countries, this is handled at the national level, whereas in others, this is handled on a state level, making the scene even more complicated.

Reshared post from +EuroTech

Spain will start taking down file sharing websites: 10 days notice!
While Europe is divided on the issue of file-sharing with a number of countries allowing for downloads the new Spanish government did not only make it illegal, but the websites doing so can be either blocked or taken down within 10 days.

Spain used to uphold the rights of people to share files for private usage. It has been reported that Spain had one of the highest rates of file-sharing in Europe. Countless court decisions have affirmed that P2P indexing sites operated legally, with most cases against site operators going in favor of the defendants.

This state of affairs led to huge pressure on Spain from the United States, and behind closed doors the two countries drafted new laws in preparation for a time when Spain was ready to clamp down on file-sharing. That time has come.

In general the European Community has last year issued directives telling the nation states that they have to implement laws against piracy however the implementation differs wildly per country.

Spain’s new government has wasted no time in approving tough new legislation to combat unauthorized file-sharing. After less than two weeks in power, the Partido Popular government has fully implemented the so-called Sinde Law. Spaniards can look forward to previously legal sites being blocked by ISPs or shut down completely, all within 10 days of a rightsholder complaint.

Noteworthy is that there are also EU members like the Netherlands where uploading is not allowed but downloading is fully legal. In most cases this will hinder the use of peer to peer networks as they usually expect the user to upload as well. However by only sharing a directory with non copyrighted material people can get around the legalities there.

Another notable European country is Switzerland. It´s exempt from EU regulations as they are not part of it. Their parliament argued that those who download illegally are the same people who purchase downloads, that is, they are customers. Switzerland reckons this means the creative owners of the goods suffer no financial harm from electronic piracy.

That seems to make a lot of sense but unfortunately not to law maker in the US and in Europe.

Unfortunately after taking power in mid-December, Spain’s incoming Partido Popular (People’s Party) government has now fully approved their pending Sustainable Economy Law (LES), legislation designed to stop Spanish Internet users from accessing file-sharing sites.

The decision on whether to shutter or block file-sharing sites will sit with the Intellectual Property Committee. This panel will have the power to take action against those providing illegal content and entities providing infrastructure, all within 10 days of a complaint by rights holders.

What is the situation in your country at the moment we wonder?

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Website Blocking Law Implemented By New Spanish Government | TorrentFreak
Spain’s new government has wasted no time in approving tough new legislation to combat unauthorized file-sharing. After less than two weeks in power, the Partido Popular government has fully implement…

One thought on “An excellent summary from +EuroTech of the differing positions of key European countries…

  1. EuroTech

    Hi +Sophie Wrobel Thanks for sharing this. I´m not sure if there are European countries where is dealt with on anything different than the national level. The word ´states´ was used here to refer to the members of the EU, but maybe you know more?

    Reply

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