Author Archives: Sophie Wrobel

About Sophie Wrobel

Sophie Wrobel is an independent research and information consultant, mother of two, and avid technology blogger. She is an advocate for digital literacy, online privacy, and technological innovation. Her current interests include online social networks, digital literacy, data privacy and protection, and information management. Sophie believes that technology can build a framework handling user data in a transparent, understandable manner. This requires a modern legal and socioeconomical framework that supports and protects the privacies of individuals and their right to control their data, no matter where it comes from, and helps individuals fully understand the implications of their online interactions.

GDPR’s twin has now passed through parliament

The GDPR (infamous for causing all of those privacy policy updates this May) now has it's twin legislation: a regulation on non-personal data. This new piece of legislation basically says that data hoarding isn't okay: if you are in the data business, you have to provide your clients with a reasonable timeframe, data in a… Read More »

What if the laws of physics weren't deterministic?

When a charged, rotating star collapses to form a black hole, there's always a 'point of no return'. You can imagine things like this: Everything closer than that point gets sucked into the new normality of physics in the world of 'life in a black hole', with no chance of ever escaping. Everything outside of… Read More »

Why social media platforms need to pick up the ethical burden in shaping freedom of information

The ‘attention economy’ is something that has infiltrated modern-day internet: content producers clamor for attention on the content they put out. And they have a strategy to do that: create content with an original twist that appeals to emotions. Things that are funny, provocative, or romantic attract a lot more attention than things that are… Read More »

Canada introduces its own version of the "Right to be Forgotten"

Last week, Canada’s Office of the Privacy Commissioner released a draft position on what to do with online privacy. Her position appears to be a toned down version of the EU’s data protection position. One of the more interesting aspects of the Canadian position is the Canadian variation of Europe’s ‚right to forget‘, which has… Read More »